Illegal behavior encouraged by Leftist group offering to cover legal fees for protesters against the new tax reform bill

Tuesday, January 02, 2018 by

Remember when the liberals tried to make it seem as though the Tea Party movement was made up of a bunch of angry, violent Americans who were pissed off at the government? Well, the ironic thing is that as time goes on, it is becoming more and more clear that it’s the progressives that believe in the use of violence as a political strategy, not the conservatives.

According to a report put together earlier this month by Judicial Watch, a Leftist nonprofit organization called Housing Works, which describes itself as a “healing community of people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS,” has pledged to pay for the legal fees of anyone who showed up at a big demonstration in Washington D.C. to protest the Republican tax plan.

An internal email that was obtained by a D.C.-based news publication reveals that Housing Works actually encouraged its supporters to commit illegal acts at the demonstration:

“We will transport, house and feed you, and deal with all legal support,” the email says. “Caveat: if you are far away from DC and expensive to transport, we can probably only fly you if you can risk arrest.” Housing Works described the protests as follows: “The Rs voted and fled the room, but were snagged by reporters in the hallway, surrounded by bird-doggers, and shamed for their disgraceful votes.”

Of course, no one is trying to deny Housing Works the right to protest the Republican tax plan – such a move would not only be unethical, but also wholly unconstitutional. But what’s so disturbing about the way in which Housing Works is operating, has to do with the fact that a significant amount of the tens of millions of dollars the group receives from the federal government each year is going towards transportation and legal fees for anti-Republican demonstrators. (Related: Groundbreaking research on the thought process of terrorists accidentally reveals how liberals justify violence and intolerance against their political opponents.)

Furthermore, it’s hard to imagine why anyone would be so opposed to the tax plan proposed and passed by the Republicans in congress, especially considering the fact that President Trump has already had an incredibly positive effect on the economy as a whole. The stock market is on the rise thanks to increased consumer confidence. Businesses are increasingly able to grow and expand as a result of fewer regulations and burdensome taxes. These new tax cuts that the Republicans have put in place will only bolster this growing economy even more, and put more money into the pockets of millions of Americans.

That being said, why are groups like Housing Works so opposed to it? (Related: Read about what the Republicans’ tax reform plan means for the Health Ranger Store.)

Perhaps it simply comes down to misinformation. According to a recent poll by CBS News, far more Americans believe that their taxes will go up as a result of this Republican-led tax overhaul than would actually experience an increase, and contrarily, far fewer Americans expect a tax cut than the new law will actually deliver.

The nonpartisan Joint Committee on Taxation’s assessment of the Senate bill found that 61.7 percent of all taxpayers will see their taxes decrease by at least $100 in the year 2019. But the CBS poll found that just 22 percent of Americans think their taxes will decrease. The committee also estimated that 8.1 percent of taxpayers will see their taxes rise, while the poll found that 44 percent of Americans expect to see their taxes go up.

Obviously, there is a significant amount of misinformation being spread about the Republicans’ tax plan, which could be why so many groups – including Housing Works – are so opposed to it.

Regardless, the use of violence or unlawful acts in political protests should never be tolerated, and Housing Works should be ashamed that they even implied to their followers that breaking the law was okay.

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